Work in the HP Quarterly 1.3

Work in the HP Quarterly 1.3
by Bryan Harvey

Spring reading: Basketball, Opiates, & Bicycles

Spring reading: Basketball, Opiates, & Bicycles
by Bryan Harvey

Translating the word Wahoo at The Cauldron

Translating the word Wahoo at The Cauldron
by Bryan Harvey

To their own devices: Pablo Larrain's 'The Club'

To their own devices: Pablo Larrain's 'The Club'
by Bryan Harvey

Read Everything That Dunks Must Converge (a novel in 3 Acts) at You Can't Eat the Basketball

September 17, 2016

(Cover art by Todd Whitehead)
Things have really slowed down here at LCB, and I feel kind of bad for that. Posting here is a sentimental affair; aside from black and white marble journals, I’ve written here more often and longer than anywhere else. On the other hand, I’m not sad at all. In the last couple months, I worked to set up You Can’t Eat theBasketball

A world of child soldiers and cowboys: 'Beasts of No Nation's' Extended Family Tree

July 28, 2016


And AK-47s that they shooting into heaven
Like they're trying to kill The Jetsons
                                                  --Lupe Fiasco, "Little Weapon"

Cary Joji Fukunaga’s film Beasts of No Nation (2015) began its journey as a novel by Uzodinma Iweala. Published in 2006, the film’s hypotext appeared on bookshelves a year earlier than Ishmael Beah’s bestselling memoir A Long Way Gone, which, although categorized as nonfiction, also began as a novel in a creative writing workshop. Around that same time, in 2008, Emmanuel Jal released his album Warchild, which received critical acclaim from publications like Rolling Stone. In other words, a general discourse about boy soldiers, colonialism in a post-colonial world, the relationships between violence and natural resources arose in the middle of the twenty-first century’s first decade, and this discourse could be equally packaged as either an entertainment commodity or a curriculum for high schoolers and neighborhood book clubs.

Early summer reads: Paying urban rent, tennis balls made from hair, masked men, & stories I didn't understand

July 9, 2016

Image taken from the teaser for the book.
Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond (2016)

The most poignant aspect of Desmond’s writing is how he understands the conjoined relations between experience and data. The first 292 pages of Evicted focus primarily on the lives of tenants in Milwaukee’s urban neighborhoods. These tenants are mostly single mothers and the children for which they struggle to provide. These stories immerse the reader in the everyday lives of the urban poor, and their battles become more real and less imagined through Desmond’s prose. In these sections, he sprinkles statistics amidst the testimony, but the people are not lost in the numbers. And yet his epilogue “Home and Hope” is twenty or so pages of data-driven argumentation. The shift is beautiful and exactly as it should be. Moreover, Desmond does not hesitate to propose solutions to a crisis he has both recreated through story and sketched with numbers, and the result is the whole elephant in the room, not just a trunk, not just a tusk, but the entire, unavoidable beast.

The end of history, or Andy Murray's attempted rivalry with Novak Djokovic

June 21, 2016


As of June 5th, the tennis season is through Roland Garros. Wimbledon will start before the end of the month. In between those two swells in the Grand Slam ocean, Andy Murray made history by winning the Queens tournament for a fifth time. He is the only player to do so, having laid waste to Milos Raonic in the tournament's championship match. This summer has also seen Murray reunite with his former coach, Ivan Lendl, in order to start winning Grand Slams again, which is the sort of history that tends to matter most in the tennis world. Of course, this accomplishment would also entail solving the Novak Djokovic conundrum. 

Truth and lies in Pixar's 'The Good Dinosaur' (2015)

June 4, 2016

A bird in the Venerable Bede's monastery.
Bob Peterson and Peter Sohn’s The Good Dinosaur (2015) is one part lie and another part truth. These ingredients do not make for a particularly unique story. Rather they spin from the DNA of past fiction a tale that is something less than myth and a bit more than history.
 

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